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Realpolitik : a history / John Bew.

By: Bew, John.
Publisher: Oxford ; Oxford University Press, [2016]Description: vi, 395 pages : illustrations ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780199331932 : (hbk.).Subject(s): Realism -- Political aspects | International relations -- Philosophy | World politicsDDC classification: 327.101 Other classification: POL010000 | POL011010
Contents:
Machine generated contents note: -- Introduction -- Part I: Real Realpolitik -- 1. The origins of Realpolitik -- 2. Foundations of Realpolitik -- 3. Realpolitik and Bismarck: a fatal compromise? -- 4. Realpolitik after Rochau -- Part II: Anti-realpolitik and the Anglo-American Worldview -- 5. The English Discovery of Realpolitik -- 6. American Realpolitik -- 7. The Coming Peace and the Eradication of Realpolitik -- Part III: Inter-war Realpolitik -- 8. The Ingestion of Realpolitik -- 9. Germany and the New Realpolitik -- 10. Machiavelli's Return? Realpolitik, Fascism and Appeasement -- Part IV: The Americanisation of Realpolitik -- 11. America's Awakening: Geopolitics and the Ethics of American Statecraft -- 12. Realpolitik through the Back Door? The Role of the Emigrés -- 13. Bismarckism and Anti-Bismarckism -- Part V: Practical Realpolitik -- 14. Reluctant Realpolitik in the Cold War Era -- 15. Realpolitik in the Nixon-Carter Era -- 16. Wither Realpolitik? The End of the Cold War and Beyond -- Conclusion: Why we need a Renaissance of Realpolitik.
Summary: "In this concise book, John Bew offers a history of the concept of Realpolitik in the English-speaking world: its origins as an idea; its practical application to statecraft in the recent past; and its relevance to the foreign policy challenges facing the United States and its allies in the future. Now most often associated with the conduct of foreign policy, Realpolitik has traditionally had pejorative connotations in the English-speaking world and sits uneasily alongside notions of "enlightenment," "morality" and "virtue." But it has also had its defenders, admirers and exponents, who regard it as the best tool for the successful wielding of political power and the preservation of global order. As such, Realpolitik has both successes and failures to its name, as Bew's comprehensive and even-handed overview displays"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: New acquisitions 2016
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Loanable Book Library
General Collection 327.101 BEW (Browse shelf) Available 000413741

Includes bibliographical references (pages [357]-375) and index.

Machine generated contents note: -- Introduction -- Part I: Real Realpolitik -- 1. The origins of Realpolitik -- 2. Foundations of Realpolitik -- 3. Realpolitik and Bismarck: a fatal compromise? -- 4. Realpolitik after Rochau -- Part II: Anti-realpolitik and the Anglo-American Worldview -- 5. The English Discovery of Realpolitik -- 6. American Realpolitik -- 7. The Coming Peace and the Eradication of Realpolitik -- Part III: Inter-war Realpolitik -- 8. The Ingestion of Realpolitik -- 9. Germany and the New Realpolitik -- 10. Machiavelli's Return? Realpolitik, Fascism and Appeasement -- Part IV: The Americanisation of Realpolitik -- 11. America's Awakening: Geopolitics and the Ethics of American Statecraft -- 12. Realpolitik through the Back Door? The Role of the Emigrés -- 13. Bismarckism and Anti-Bismarckism -- Part V: Practical Realpolitik -- 14. Reluctant Realpolitik in the Cold War Era -- 15. Realpolitik in the Nixon-Carter Era -- 16. Wither Realpolitik? The End of the Cold War and Beyond -- Conclusion: Why we need a Renaissance of Realpolitik.

"In this concise book, John Bew offers a history of the concept of Realpolitik in the English-speaking world: its origins as an idea; its practical application to statecraft in the recent past; and its relevance to the foreign policy challenges facing the United States and its allies in the future. Now most often associated with the conduct of foreign policy, Realpolitik has traditionally had pejorative connotations in the English-speaking world and sits uneasily alongside notions of "enlightenment," "morality" and "virtue." But it has also had its defenders, admirers and exponents, who regard it as the best tool for the successful wielding of political power and the preservation of global order. As such, Realpolitik has both successes and failures to its name, as Bew's comprehensive and even-handed overview displays"-- Provided by publisher.

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