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Arthur Griffith with James Joyce & WB Yeats : liberating Ireland / Anthony J. Jordan.

By: Jordan, Anthony J.
Publisher: Dublin : Westport Books, 2014Description: 221 p. : ill. (black and white) ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9780957622906 (pbk.) :.Subject(s): Griffith, Arthur, 1871-1922 | Yeats, W. B. (William Butler), 1865-1939 -- Political and social views | Joyce, James, 1882-1941. -- Political and social viewsDDC classification: 941.50821 Summary: This is a biography of Arthur Griffith but the extensive links between him and James Joyce & WB Yeats, forced Joyce & Yeats into title. Griffith edited the 'United Irishman' from 1899. He was a close nationalist colleague with Yeats & Maud Gonne and promoted Yeats the budding poet and playwright. Griffith was the first ti introduce Joyce to the Irish public. In 1901 Joyce's essay for his university magazine was censored. Griffith gave it a review and wrote a piece about Joyce being censored, commenting that "turnips would be more useful than censors". Griffith continued to support Joyce trying to publish 'Dubliners'. When they met in Dublin Joyce told him that he was trying to liberate the Irish people spiritually through his novel i.e. Ulysses and Griffith was trying to liberate them economically & politically. In Feb 1922 when Ulysses was published Griffith had become President of Dail Eireann [Irish Parliament]. Griffith features extensively throughout 'Ulysses' as the author of ' The Resurrection of Hungary' in 1904 and and founder of Sinn Fein in 1905. Yeats became lukewarm on Irish nationalism when Griffith's friend, Major John MacBride, married Maud Gonne. Griffith & Yeats differed over literature and nationalism and had several major disagreements. Yet in 1922 when Griffith died prematurely, Yeats made an outstanding speech in the senate about his old colleague. Griffith was the thinker behind the Irish revival and saw independence come before his death. He has largely been forgotten but lives on in 'Ulysses'. (www.amazon.co.uk).
List(s) this item appears in: New acquisitions 2017
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Loanable Book Library
Irish Collection 941.50821 JOR (Browse shelf) Available 000413325

Includes bibliographical references and index.

This is a biography of Arthur Griffith but the extensive links between him and James Joyce & WB Yeats, forced Joyce & Yeats into title. Griffith edited the 'United Irishman' from 1899. He was a close nationalist colleague with Yeats & Maud Gonne and promoted Yeats the budding poet and playwright. Griffith was the first ti introduce Joyce to the Irish public. In 1901 Joyce's essay for his university magazine was censored. Griffith gave it a review and wrote a piece about Joyce being censored, commenting that "turnips would be more useful than censors". Griffith continued to support Joyce trying to publish 'Dubliners'. When they met in Dublin Joyce told him that he was trying to liberate the Irish people spiritually through his novel i.e. Ulysses and Griffith was trying to liberate them economically & politically. In Feb 1922 when Ulysses was published Griffith had become President of Dail Eireann [Irish Parliament]. Griffith features extensively throughout 'Ulysses' as the author of ' The Resurrection of Hungary' in 1904 and and founder of Sinn Fein in 1905.
Yeats became lukewarm on Irish nationalism when Griffith's friend, Major John MacBride, married Maud Gonne. Griffith & Yeats differed over literature and nationalism and had several major disagreements. Yet in 1922 when Griffith died prematurely, Yeats made an outstanding speech in the senate about his old colleague. Griffith was the thinker behind the Irish revival and saw independence come before his death. He has largely been forgotten but lives on in 'Ulysses'. (www.amazon.co.uk).

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