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Blood letters : the untold story of Lin Zhao, a Martyr in Mao's China / Lian Xi.

By: Lian, Xi.
Publisher: New York : Basic Books, an imprint of Perseus Books, a subsidiary of Hachette Book Group, 2018Description: vii, 331 p. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781541644236 (hardcover).Subject(s): Xi, Lian -- Biography | China -- Cultural policy -- History -- 20th century | China -- History -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 951.056
Contents:
Introduction -- 1. To live under the Sun -- 2. Exchanging leather shoes for straw sandals -- 3. The crown -- 4. A spark of fire -- 5. Shattered jade -- 6. Lampligh in the snowy fields -- 7. The white-haired girl of Tilanqiao -- 8. Blood letters home -- Afterword.
Summary: Blood letters tells the astonishing story of Lin Zhao, a Chinese poet and journalist arrested by the authorities in 1960 and executed eight years later, at the height of the Cultural revolution. The only Chinese citizen known to have openly and steadfastly opposed communism under Mao, she rooted her dissent in her Christian faith, and expressed it by writing in her own blood, at times on her clothes and on cloth torn from her bed sheets.
List(s) this item appears in: New Acquisitions July-August 2018
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Loanable Book Library
General Collection 951.056 XIL (Browse shelf) Available

Includes bibliographical references and index.

Introduction -- 1. To live under the Sun -- 2. Exchanging leather shoes for straw sandals -- 3. The crown -- 4. A spark of fire -- 5. Shattered jade -- 6. Lampligh in the snowy fields -- 7. The white-haired girl of Tilanqiao -- 8. Blood letters home -- Afterword.

Blood letters tells the astonishing story of Lin Zhao, a Chinese poet and journalist arrested by the authorities in 1960 and executed eight years later, at the height of the Cultural revolution. The only Chinese citizen known to have openly and steadfastly opposed communism under Mao, she rooted her dissent in her Christian faith, and expressed it by writing in her own blood, at times on her clothes and on cloth torn from her bed sheets.

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