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Motherfoclóir : dispatches from a not so dead language / Darach Ó Séaghdha.

By: Publisher: London : Head of Zeus, 2017Description: xi, 222 pages ; 21 cmISBN:
  • 9781786691866
  • 1786691868
Subject(s): DDC classification:
  • 491.62 23
LOC classification:
  • PB1216 .O84 2017
Contents:
Irish names or, 'How's that, like, pronounced?' -- Primary school -- Secondary school: the descent into adolescence -- Ní Thuigim (I don't understand) -- Ní Thuigim II: Irish twins -- Secondary school continued...Peig and the Modh Coinníollach -- You remind me of someone -- Lost words -- Film -- Our words -- Our words II: the great Feamainn: Irish, seaweed and the deep -- People and other animals -- Cuimilt Faoi Dheis: Irish today -- Us -- Love and politics -- Seanfhocail -- Storytelling and magic -- Language and the bureaucracy -- Conclusion: Candlelight.
Summary: "This is a highly enjoyable book about the Irish language, a concept unimaginable to generations of Irish people who emerged from school with a little knowledge of grammar and a vocabulary that gradually withered as they never used the language in everyday life. Darach Ó Séeghdha, curator of the popular Twitter account @theirishfor, set out to 'build a palace from the rubble of everyone else's smashed expectations.' He writes for people who expect the Irish language only to be confined to subjects of no interest to them, for people who think that Irish doesn't belong to them and for those who say they can't remember a word of it. In each case he surprises us with witty, learned and strange observations about the origins of words, their meaning and their connections. This is 'a playground of language', as the author says: meditations on the meanings of Irish names, the strange spellings, the 'lost' words that have faded from use and those words and phrases that have no equivalent in English. This is a drily-humorous and deeply personal book. And it can be enjoyed by all lovers of language- any language."--book jacket
List(s) this item appears in: New acquisitions 2018
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Holdings
Item type Current library Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Loanable Book Library Irish Collection 491.62 OSE (Browse shelf(Opens below)) Available 000438855

Irish names or, 'How's that, like, pronounced?' -- Primary school -- Secondary school: the descent into adolescence -- Ní Thuigim (I don't understand) -- Ní Thuigim II: Irish twins -- Secondary school continued...Peig and the Modh Coinníollach -- You remind me of someone -- Lost words -- Film -- Our words -- Our words II: the great Feamainn: Irish, seaweed and the deep -- People and other animals -- Cuimilt Faoi Dheis: Irish today -- Us -- Love and politics -- Seanfhocail -- Storytelling and magic -- Language and the bureaucracy -- Conclusion: Candlelight.

"This is a highly enjoyable book about the Irish language, a concept unimaginable to generations of Irish people who emerged from school with a little knowledge of grammar and a vocabulary that gradually withered as they never used the language in everyday life. Darach Ó Séeghdha, curator of the popular Twitter account @theirishfor, set out to 'build a palace from the rubble of everyone else's smashed expectations.' He writes for people who expect the Irish language only to be confined to subjects of no interest to them, for people who think that Irish doesn't belong to them and for those who say they can't remember a word of it. In each case he surprises us with witty, learned and strange observations about the origins of words, their meaning and their connections. This is 'a playground of language', as the author says: meditations on the meanings of Irish names, the strange spellings, the 'lost' words that have faded from use and those words and phrases that have no equivalent in English. This is a drily-humorous and deeply personal book. And it can be enjoyed by all lovers of language- any language."--book jacket

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