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Heart of darkness / Joseph Conrad ; with an introduction by Verlyn Klinkenborg.

By: Conrad, Joseph, 1857-1924.
Contributor(s): Klinkenborg, Verlyn.
Series: Everyman's library: Publisher: London : David Campbell, 1993Description: xxix, 110 p. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 1857151747.Subject(s): Imperialism in literature | Congo (Democratic Republic) -- Race relations -- History -- 19th centuryDDC classification: 823 Summary: "In a novella which remains highly controversial to this day, Conrad explores the relations between Africa and Europe. On the surface, this is a horrifying tale of colonial exploitation. The narrator, Marlowe, journeys on business deep into the heart of Africa. But there he encounters Kurtz, an idealist apparently crazed and depraved by his power over the natives, and the meeting prompts Marlowe to reflect on the darkness at the heart of all men. This short but complex and often ambiguous story, which has been the basis of several films and plays, continues to provoke interpretation and discussion." - Copac
List(s) this item appears in: Everyman's Library Classics
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Loanable Book Library
General Collection 823 CON (Browse shelf) Checked out 04/10/2019 000438579

"First published: 1902. First included in the Everyman's Library 1967." - t.p. verso

"In a novella which remains highly controversial to this day, Conrad explores the relations between Africa and Europe. On the surface, this is a horrifying tale of colonial exploitation. The narrator, Marlowe, journeys on business deep into the heart of Africa. But there he encounters Kurtz, an idealist apparently crazed and depraved by his power over the natives, and the meeting prompts Marlowe to reflect on the darkness at the heart of all men. This short but complex and often ambiguous story, which has been the basis of several films and plays, continues to provoke interpretation and discussion." - Copac

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