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Teffi : a life of letters and of laughter / Edythe Haber.

By: Haber, Edythe C.
Publisher: London : I.B. Tauris, 2019Description: xvi, 288 pages, 24 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (black and white), portraits ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781788312585.Subject(s): Tėffi, N. A. (Nadezhda Aleksandrovna), 1872-1952 | Women authors, Russian -- 20th century -- Biography | Authors, Russian -- 20th century -- BiographyDDC classification: 920 Summary: "Teffi was one of twentieth century Russia's most celebrated authors. Born Nadezhda Lokhvitskaya in 1872, she came to be admired by an impressive range of people-- from Tsar Nicholas II to Lenin-- and her popularity was such that sweets and perfume were named after her. She visited Tolstoy when she was 13 to haggle with him about the ending of 'War and Peace' and Rasputin tried (and utterly failed) to seduce her. After the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 she was exiled and lived out her days in the lively Russian émigré community of Paris, where she continued writing, and enjoying comparable fame, until her death in 1952. Teffi's best stories effortlessly shift from light humor and satire to pathos and even tragedy-- ever more so when depicting the daunting hardships she and her fellow émigrés suffered in exile" - Copac
List(s) this item appears in: New acquisitions July-August 2019
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Biography 920 TEF (Browse shelf) Available

Includes bibliographical references and index.

"Teffi was one of twentieth century Russia's most celebrated authors. Born Nadezhda Lokhvitskaya in 1872, she came to be admired by an impressive range of people-- from Tsar Nicholas II to Lenin-- and her popularity was such that sweets and perfume were named after her. She visited Tolstoy when she was 13 to haggle with him about the ending of 'War and Peace' and Rasputin tried (and utterly failed) to seduce her. After the Bolshevik Revolution of 1917 she was exiled and lived out her days in the lively Russian émigré community of Paris, where she continued writing, and enjoying comparable fame, until her death in 1952. Teffi's best stories effortlessly shift from light humor and satire to pathos and even tragedy-- ever more so when depicting the daunting hardships she and her fellow émigrés suffered in exile" - Copac

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