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Markievicz : a most outrageous rebel / Lindie Naughton.

By: Naughton, Lindie.
Publisher: Newbridge : Merrion Press, [2018]Description: x, 320 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates : ill. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9781785372216 : (pbk.).Subject(s): Markievicz, Constance de, 1868-1927 -- Biography | Fianna Éireann | Sinn Fein -- Biography | Dáil Éireann | Lissadell House (Sligo, Ireland) | Revolutionaries -- Ireland -- Biography | Politicians -- Ireland -- Biography | Sligo (Ireland : County) -- Biography | Ireland -- Biography. -- History -- War of Independence, 1919-1921DDC classification: 941.7082
Contents:
Alien class, alien race -- Under Ben Bulben -- Casi and Con -- The play's the thing -- Extremists and fire-eaters -- Na Fianna - scouting for Ireland -- 'The cause of labour is the cause of Ireland' -- Locked out -- Two Cathleen Ní Houlihans -- Ireland is waking -- Easter week 1916 - year one of Irish history -- Condemned to live -- Sinn Féin - We ourselves -- Nienteen hundred and nineteen -- The shadow of a gunman -- 'I have seen the stars' -- Anarchy is loosed -- No enemy but time
Summary: Countess Constance Markievicz – one of the most remarkable women in Irish history – was a revolutionary, a socialist and a feminist, as well as an artist and writer. A natural leader, “Madame”, as she was known to thousands of Dubliners, took an active part in the 1916 Rising and was one of the few leaders to escape execution. Instead, she spent an arduous year in an English prison, surrounded by murderers, prostitutes and thieves. Later, during another stretch in prison, she would make history as the first woman elected to the British Houses of Parliament, and momentous event that is due to receive widespread commemoration at the time of its centenary in December 2018. Lindie Naughton’s compelling biography sheds light on all facets of Markievicz’s life – her privileged upbringing in County Sligo, her adventures as an art student in London and Paris, her marriage to an improbable Polish count, her political education, her several prison terms, and her emergence as one of the pivotal figures in early 20th century Britain and Ireland. Constance Markievicz, a woman with a huge heart, battled all her adult life to establish an Irish republic based on co-operation and equality for all. Her message is as relevant today as it was a century ago.
List(s) this item appears in: New acquisitions Nov - Dec 2019
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Loanable Book Library
Irish Collection 920 MAR (Browse shelf) Available 000438336

Includes bibliographical references (pages [293]-305) and index.

Alien class, alien race -- Under Ben Bulben -- Casi and Con -- The play's the thing -- Extremists and fire-eaters -- Na Fianna - scouting for Ireland -- 'The cause of labour is the cause of Ireland' -- Locked out -- Two Cathleen Ní Houlihans -- Ireland is waking -- Easter week 1916 - year one of Irish history -- Condemned to live -- Sinn Féin - We ourselves -- Nienteen hundred and nineteen -- The shadow of a gunman -- 'I have seen the stars' -- Anarchy is loosed -- No enemy but time

Countess Constance Markievicz – one of the most remarkable women in Irish history – was a revolutionary, a socialist and a feminist, as well as an artist and writer. A natural leader, “Madame”, as she was known to thousands of Dubliners, took an active part in the 1916 Rising and was one of the few leaders to escape execution. Instead, she spent an arduous year in an English prison, surrounded by murderers, prostitutes and thieves. Later, during another stretch in prison, she would make history as the first woman elected to the British Houses of Parliament, and momentous event that is due to receive widespread commemoration at the time of its centenary in December 2018.

Lindie Naughton’s compelling biography sheds light on all facets of Markievicz’s life – her privileged upbringing in County Sligo, her adventures as an art student in London and Paris, her marriage to an improbable Polish count, her political education, her several prison terms, and her emergence as one of the pivotal figures in early 20th century Britain and Ireland. Constance Markievicz, a woman with a huge heart, battled all her adult life to establish an Irish republic based on co-operation and equality for all. Her message is as relevant today as it was a century ago.

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