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May you live in interesting times / Conor O'Clery.

By: O'Clery, Conor.
Publisher: Dublin : Poolbeg Press, 2008Description: xxi, 362 p., [16] p. of plates : ill. (chiefly col.), ports. ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9781842233252 : (pbk.).Subject(s): O'Clery, Conor | The Irish Times, Dublin | Journalists -- Ireland -- Biography. -- 20th century | History, Modern -- 20th century | Moscow (Russia) -- Description and travel | China -- Description and travel | New York (N.Y.) -- Description and travelDDC classification: 920
Contents:
Introduction: The second rough draft of history -- Paradise lost -- The great game -- Saddam pays my expenses -- Small potatoes -- Nous sommes amis -- Travels with the pope -- Allegro non troppo -- The point of no return -- An Irishman in Moscow -- The day after -- The end of history -- Spoiled forever -- Wars without end -- The KGB and me -- An irritated city -- On being a pencil -- Dining for Ireland -- The Bishop Casey affair -- Shaking hands with the Devil -- Civil War without the rifles -- Arresting experiences -- Love live democracy -- Second act of the trilogy -- No third act -- The country that isn't -- Who killed Zorig? -- Black eye for democracy -- The little cold war -- The day of living dangerously -- Liberating the Turismo -- A long wait for a train -- All is not forgiven -- You read it here first -- The new front line -- That the wrong may cease
Summary: As a pioneering foreign correspondent, Conor O'Clery has been witness to some of the major world events of the past thirty years, including the Russian invasion of Afghanistan, the Iran-Iraq war, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Clinton years in the White House, the opening up of China, he fall of Indonesia's Suharto, the liberation of East Timor and global warming in the Arctic. He was named journalist of the year for his reporting of the end of the Cold War, and journalist and reporter of the year for his vivid eye-witness accounts of the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center. In his career with The Irish Times he opened the newspaper's first Moscow bureau and went on to establish and run staff offices in Washington, Beijing and New York before returning to live in Dublin. He shows life as a journalist on the cutting edge of history.
List(s) this item appears in: New Acquisitions Jan.-Feb. 2020
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Loanable Book Library
Irish Collection 920 OCL (Browse shelf) Checked out 02/03/2020 000438352

Includes index.

Introduction: The second rough draft of history -- Paradise lost -- The great game -- Saddam pays my expenses -- Small potatoes -- Nous sommes amis -- Travels with the pope -- Allegro non troppo -- The point of no return -- An Irishman in Moscow -- The day after -- The end of history -- Spoiled forever -- Wars without end -- The KGB and me -- An irritated city -- On being a pencil -- Dining for Ireland -- The Bishop Casey affair -- Shaking hands with the Devil -- Civil War without the rifles -- Arresting experiences -- Love live democracy -- Second act of the trilogy -- No third act -- The country that isn't -- Who killed Zorig? -- Black eye for democracy -- The little cold war -- The day of living dangerously -- Liberating the Turismo -- A long wait for a train -- All is not forgiven -- You read it here first -- The new front line -- That the wrong may cease

As a pioneering foreign correspondent, Conor O'Clery has been witness to some of the major world events of the past thirty years, including the Russian invasion of Afghanistan, the Iran-Iraq war, the collapse of the Soviet Union, the Clinton years in the White House, the opening up of China, he fall of Indonesia's Suharto, the liberation of East Timor and global warming in the Arctic.

He was named journalist of the year for his reporting of the end of the Cold War, and journalist and reporter of the year for his vivid eye-witness accounts of the 9/11 attack on the World Trade Center.

In his career with The Irish Times he opened the newspaper's first Moscow bureau and went on to establish and run staff offices in Washington, Beijing and New York before returning to live in Dublin. He shows life as a journalist on the cutting edge of history.

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