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Mystery and the culture of science : personal insights for the 21st century / Jim Malone, John McEvoy.

By: Malone, Jim.
Contributor(s): McEvoy, John.
Publisher: Newcastle upon Tyne : Cambridge Scholars Publishing, 2019Description: 145 p. ; 21 cm.ISBN: 9781527520349 : (hbk.).Subject(s): Religion and science | Philosophy and science | Intellectual life | Debates and debating | Culture studies | Creative ability in science | Science research -- PhilosophyDDC classification: 215
Contents:
What can theology learn from the scientific method? -- Confronting the comfort of polarisation -- Uncertainty and the 'idolatry of infallibility' -- The power of prayer: efficacy of remote intercessory prayer? -- Myster and creativity in science: reflection on and revaluation in a painting -- Evolution and incarnation
Summary: Mystery is only one step behind the best insights of science and theology. This book deals with the methodology common to both and concludes that all knowledge reflects the culture in which it was articulated and is provisional in the sense that it can always be improved. Failure to respect this lies at the heart of much of the polarisation currently seen in religion and elsewhere.
List(s) this item appears in: New Acquisitions Jan.-Feb. 2020
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Loanable Book Library
General Collection 215 MAL (Browse shelf) Checked out 20/03/2020 000437959

Includes bibliographic references.

What can theology learn from the scientific method? -- Confronting the comfort of polarisation -- Uncertainty and the 'idolatry of infallibility' -- The power of prayer: efficacy of remote intercessory prayer? -- Myster and creativity in science: reflection on and revaluation in a painting -- Evolution and incarnation

Mystery is only one step behind the best insights of science and theology. This book deals with the methodology common to both and concludes that all knowledge reflects the culture in which it was articulated and is provisional in the sense that it can always be improved. Failure to respect this lies at the heart of much of the polarisation currently seen in religion and elsewhere.

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