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Love is green: compassion as responsibility in the ecological emergency / Lucy Weir.

By: Weir, Lucy.
Series: Series on climate change and society.Publisher: Wilmington : Vernon Press, 2020Description: xxii, 221 pages ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781622733729.Subject(s): Consciousness | Decision makingDDC classification: 153.4 Summary: "This book links three themes, non-dualistic agency, 'the good' of systems, and compassionate attunement, and relates them to the ecological emergency. The author begins by examining how we currently understand our ability to choose what we do, our agency and conclude that this is dualistic: we think of an action to do, and then we physically act. Yet an understanding that we are enmeshed in context means our capacity to act freely dissolves in the mesh. We evolved capacities for consciousness and awareness, capacities that allow us to realise that we are here, now but that do not inevitably imply choice. Our capacity for 'realisation' gives us the ability to elicit an emotional response. When we understand our enmeshment, we can attune to a deep compassion for ourselves and indeed for all systems unfolding through time. Compassionate attunement allows a different set of options for action to become available to us. This then shifts how we respond to ourselves, our human relationships and to the ecological emergency, we are currently embroiled in. This work is inspired by the great Kamakura Zen Master Eihei D�ygen. The book's contribution is to extend and link the notion of practice-realisation with the literature on evolutionary biology and entropy maximisation which allows us to speak of 'the good' of systems. Systems unfold as 'good' for us when biodiversity maximisation occurs. By considering the ecological emergency in light of compassionate attunement, we open ourselves to a new array of possibilities for action. Some of these the author outlines in the conclusion, relating them to existing literature on compassionate achievement and compassionate communication, to show how our this practice shifts our relationship to ourselves, to one another, and to the ecological emergency, thus changing the course of human history"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: New Acquisitions March. 2020
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Loanable Book Library
General Collection 153.4 WEI (Browse shelf) Available 000437972

"This book links three themes, non-dualistic agency, 'the good' of systems, and compassionate attunement, and relates them to the ecological emergency. The author begins by examining how we currently understand our ability to choose what we do, our agency and conclude that this is dualistic: we think of an action to do, and then we physically act. Yet an understanding that we are enmeshed in context means our capacity to act freely dissolves in the mesh. We evolved capacities for consciousness and awareness, capacities that allow us to realise that we are here, now but that do not inevitably imply choice. Our capacity for 'realisation' gives us the ability to elicit an emotional response. When we understand our enmeshment, we can attune to a deep compassion for ourselves and indeed for all systems unfolding through time. Compassionate attunement allows a different set of options for action to become available to us. This then shifts how we respond to ourselves, our human relationships and to the ecological emergency, we are currently embroiled in. This work is inspired by the great Kamakura Zen Master Eihei D�ygen. The book's contribution is to extend and link the notion of practice-realisation with the literature on evolutionary biology and entropy maximisation which allows us to speak of 'the good' of systems. Systems unfold as 'good' for us when biodiversity maximisation occurs. By considering the ecological emergency in light of compassionate attunement, we open ourselves to a new array of possibilities for action. Some of these the author outlines in the conclusion, relating them to existing literature on compassionate achievement and compassionate communication, to show how our this practice shifts our relationship to ourselves, to one another, and to the ecological emergency, thus changing the course of human history"-- Provided by publisher.

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