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'Cherry' Ingram : the Englishman who saved Japan's blossoms / Naoko Abe.

By: Abe, Naoko.
Publisher: London : Chatto & Windus, 2019Description: xix, 380 pages, 12 unnumbered pages of plates : illustrations (black and white, and colour), map (black and white) ; 23 cm.ISBN: 9781784742027.Subject(s): Ingram, Collingwood, 1880-1981 | Botanists -- Great Britain -- Biography | Japanese flowering cherry -- History | Flowering cherries -- Great Britain -- History | BotanyDDC classification: 580.920 Summary: "Collingwood Ingram, known as ‘Cherry’ for his defining obsession, was born in 1880 and lived until he was a hundred, witnessing a fraught century of conflict and change. After visiting Japan in 1902 and 1907 and discovering two magnificent cherry trees in the garden of his family home in Kent in 1919, Ingram fell in love with cherry blossoms, or sakura, and dedicated much of his life to their cultivation and preservation. On a 1926 trip to Japan to search for new specimens, Ingram was shocked to see the loss of local cherry diversity, driven by modernization, neglect and a dangerous and creeping ideology. A cloned cherry, the Somei-yoshino, was taking over the landscape and becoming the symbol of Japan's expansionist ambitions." - Book cover
List(s) this item appears in: New Acquisitions March. 2020 | Acquisitions 2019-2020
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Loanable Book Library
General Collection 580.920 ABE (Browse shelf) Available 000438117

"Collingwood Ingram, known as ‘Cherry’ for his defining obsession, was born in 1880 and lived until he was a hundred, witnessing a fraught century of conflict and change. After visiting Japan in 1902 and 1907 and discovering two magnificent cherry trees in the garden of his family home in Kent in 1919, Ingram fell in love with cherry blossoms, or sakura, and dedicated much of his life to their cultivation and preservation. On a 1926 trip to Japan to search for new specimens, Ingram was shocked to see the loss of local cherry diversity, driven by modernization, neglect and a dangerous and creeping ideology. A cloned cherry, the Somei-yoshino, was taking over the landscape and becoming the symbol of Japan's expansionist ambitions." - Book cover

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