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The cosmopolitan tradition : a noble but flawed ideal / Martha C. Nussbaum.

By: Nussbaum, Martha Craven, (Martha Craven), 1947-.
Publisher: Cambridge, Massachusetts : The Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 2019Description: 309 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9780674052499.Subject(s): Analysis (Philosophy)DDC classification: 170
Contents:
World citizens -- Duties of justice, duties of material aid: Cicero's problematic legacy -- The worth of human dignity: two tensions in Stoic cosmopolitanism -- Grotius: a society of states and individuals under moral law -- "Mutilated and deformed": Adam Smith on the material basis of human capabilities -- The tradition and today's world: five problems -- From cosmopolitanism to the capabilities approach.
Summary: The cosmopolitan tradition begins with Diogenes, who claimed as his identity "citizen of the world." Martha Nussbaum traces the cosmopolitan ideal from ancient times to the present, weighing its limitations as well as merits. Using the capabilities approach, Nussbaum seeks to integrate the "noble but flawed" vision of world citizenship with cosmopolitanism's concern with moral and political justice for all.-- Provided by publisher
List(s) this item appears in: New Acquisitions March. 2020
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Loanable Book Library
General Collection 170 NUS (Browse shelf) Available 000438309

Includes bibliographical references (pages 281-288) and index.

World citizens -- Duties of justice, duties of material aid: Cicero's problematic legacy -- The worth of human dignity: two tensions in Stoic cosmopolitanism -- Grotius: a society of states and individuals under moral law -- "Mutilated and deformed": Adam Smith on the material basis of human capabilities -- The tradition and today's world: five problems -- From cosmopolitanism to the capabilities approach.

The cosmopolitan tradition begins with Diogenes, who claimed as his identity "citizen of the world." Martha Nussbaum traces the cosmopolitan ideal from ancient times to the present, weighing its limitations as well as merits. Using the capabilities approach, Nussbaum seeks to integrate the "noble but flawed" vision of world citizenship with cosmopolitanism's concern with moral and political justice for all.-- Provided by publisher

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