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Land of tears : the exploration and exploitation of equatorial Africa / Robert Harms.

By: Harms, Robert W, 1946-.
Publisher: New York : Basic Books, 2019Edition: First edition.Description: v, 537 pages : illustrations, maps ; 25 cm.ISBN: 9780465028634.Subject(s): Africa, Central -- History -- To 1884 | Africa, Central -- Colonization -- Environmental aspects | Africa, Central -- Colonization -- Social aspectsDDC classification: 967.031
Contents:
Manyema -- Atlantic Coast -- Highway of Commerce -- Homeward Bound -- Torrent of Treaties -- Creating the Congos -- Rescuing Emin -- Things Fall Apart -- Concession Companies -- Red Rubber Scandals -- End of Red Rubber.
Summary: "In Land of Tears, historian Robert Harms reconstructs the chaotic process by which the heart of Africa was utterly transformed in the nineteenth century and the rainforest of the Congo River basin became one of the most brutally exploited places on earth. Ranging from remote African villages to European diplomatic meetings to Connecticut piano-key factories, Harms reveals how equatorial Africa became fully, fatefully, and tragically enmeshed within our global world"-- Provided by publisher.
List(s) this item appears in: Acquisitions 2019-2020 | New Acquisitions August-October 2020
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Loanable Book Library
General Collection 967.031 HAR (Browse shelf) Available 000437780

Includes bibliographical references (pages 473-522) and index.

Manyema -- Atlantic Coast -- Highway of Commerce -- Homeward Bound -- Torrent of Treaties -- Creating the Congos -- Rescuing Emin -- Things Fall Apart -- Concession Companies -- Red Rubber Scandals -- End of Red Rubber.

"In Land of Tears, historian Robert Harms reconstructs the chaotic process by which the heart of Africa was utterly transformed in the nineteenth century and the rainforest of the Congo River basin became one of the most brutally exploited places on earth. Ranging from remote African villages to European diplomatic meetings to Connecticut piano-key factories, Harms reveals how equatorial Africa became fully, fatefully, and tragically enmeshed within our global world"-- Provided by publisher.

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