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Assessing the 1984 Ulysses / edited by C. George Sandulescu and Clive Hart.

Contributor(s): Sandulescu, Constantin-George [editor.] | Hart, Clive [editor.] | Ellmann, Richard, 1918-1987 [contributor.] | Burgess, Anthony, 1917-1993 [contributor.] | Hayman, David [contributor.].
Series: Princess Grace Irish Library: 1Publisher: Gerrards Cross : Smythe, 1986Description: xxiv, 247 pp. ; 22 cm.ISBN: 086140243 x : (hbk.).Subject(s): Joyce, James, 1882-1941. Ulysses -- Criticism, Textual | Princess Grace Irish Library | Irish literature -- History and criticism. -- 20th century | English literature -- Irish authors -- History and criticism. -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 823.912
Contents:
A brief note about this book -- Foreword: A Finnegan's wake approach to Ulysses / Anthony Burgess -- Acknowledgements -- Abbreviations and conventions -- The editions of Ulysses -- How this particular funforall came about / C. George Sandulescu -- Joyce the scribe and the right hand reader / Rosa Maria Bollettieri Bosinelli -- Typography underrated: a note on Aeolus / Giovanni Cianci -- On Mondadori's telemachia / Carla de Petris -- A crux in the new edition of Ulysses / Richard Ellmann -- Unanswered questions about a questionable answer / Wilhelm Fueger -- Why does one re-read Ulysses? / Michael Patrick Gillespie -- Art thou real, my ideal? / Clive Hart -- Balancing the book, or pro and contra the gabler Ulysses / David Hayman -- Reconstructing Ulysses in a deconstructive mode / Suzette Henke -- Dublin 1904 / Ricard M. Kain -- Italics in Ulysses / Carla Marengo Vaglio -- Textual criticism, literary theory and the new Ulysses / Ira B. Nadel -- From Telemachus to Penelope: episodes anonymous? / Patrick Parrinder -- Some critical comments on the Telemachia in the 1984 Ulysses / Charles Peake -- Curios of signs I am here / C. George Sandulescu -- Ulysses between corruption and correction / Fritz Senn -- Ulysses in Spanish / Francisco Garcia Tortosa -- THe 1922 and 1984 editions: some philosophical considerations -- Appendix: The conference programme and list of participants
Summary: "Alongside Eliot's Waste Land and Ezra Pound's Cantos, Ulysses is unquestionably the most important literary text of this century. That is why it is both natural and necessary to pay more than the usual attention to the significant detail embedded in that monumental work. Joyce demanded that Ulysses be published on his fortieth birthday, 2 February 1922. He forced the non-English-speaking printers in Dijon to work against next to impossible deadlines, and from almost unreadable manuscripts and proofs, so clotted were they with revisions. For this and other reasons, Joyce himself was acutely aware of the unusually large number of 'errors' in the body of the book, and said as much in his letters to friends. There 'errors' irritated him so much that he even issued a number of errata lists during his lifetime, but to no avail. All editions of Ulysses teemed with misprints and other 'errors': this is about the only statement on which there is genuine critical consensus. In the late 1970s a comprehensive research project was mounted in Munich in systematically to deal with these 'errors' with the aid of a sophisticated computer program. The outcome was the 'error-free' edition of Ulysses published on Bloomsday 1984. The sole purpose of the conference held in Monaco in 1985, bringing together some of the most outstanding experts of the Joycean text, was to scrutinise collectively the validity of the changes made by the Munich team." --From the dust-jacket.
List(s) this item appears in: New Acquisitions Summer 2021
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Loanable Book Library
Irish Reserve 823.912 JOY/SAN (Browse shelf) Available 000437408

Conference proceedings.

Includes bibliographies and index.

A brief note about this book -- Foreword: A Finnegan's wake approach to Ulysses / Anthony Burgess -- Acknowledgements -- Abbreviations and conventions -- The editions of Ulysses -- How this particular funforall came about / C. George Sandulescu -- Joyce the scribe and the right hand reader / Rosa Maria Bollettieri Bosinelli -- Typography underrated: a note on Aeolus / Giovanni Cianci -- On Mondadori's telemachia / Carla de Petris -- A crux in the new edition of Ulysses / Richard Ellmann -- Unanswered questions about a questionable answer / Wilhelm Fueger -- Why does one re-read Ulysses? / Michael Patrick Gillespie -- Art thou real, my ideal? / Clive Hart -- Balancing the book, or pro and contra the gabler Ulysses / David Hayman -- Reconstructing Ulysses in a deconstructive mode / Suzette Henke -- Dublin 1904 / Ricard M. Kain -- Italics in Ulysses / Carla Marengo Vaglio -- Textual criticism, literary theory and the new Ulysses / Ira B. Nadel -- From Telemachus to Penelope: episodes anonymous? / Patrick Parrinder -- Some critical comments on the Telemachia in the 1984 Ulysses / Charles Peake -- Curios of signs I am here / C. George Sandulescu -- Ulysses between corruption and correction / Fritz Senn -- Ulysses in Spanish / Francisco Garcia Tortosa -- THe 1922 and 1984 editions: some philosophical considerations -- Appendix: The conference programme and list of participants

"Alongside Eliot's Waste Land and Ezra Pound's Cantos, Ulysses is unquestionably the most important literary text of this century. That is why it is both natural and necessary to pay more than the usual attention to the significant detail embedded in that monumental work. Joyce demanded that Ulysses be published on his fortieth birthday, 2 February 1922. He forced the non-English-speaking printers in Dijon to work against next to impossible deadlines, and from almost unreadable manuscripts and proofs, so clotted were they with revisions. For this and other reasons, Joyce himself was acutely aware of the unusually large number of 'errors' in the body of the book, and said as much in his letters to friends. There 'errors' irritated him so much that he even issued a number of errata lists during his lifetime, but to no avail. All editions of Ulysses teemed with misprints and other 'errors': this is about the only statement on which there is genuine critical consensus. In the late 1970s a comprehensive research project was mounted in Munich in systematically to deal with these 'errors' with the aid of a sophisticated computer program. The outcome was the 'error-free' edition of Ulysses published on Bloomsday 1984. The sole purpose of the conference held in Monaco in 1985, bringing together some of the most outstanding experts of the Joycean text, was to scrutinise collectively the validity of the changes made by the Munich team."

--From the dust-jacket.

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