RDS Library & Archives

Normal view MARC view ISBD view

Ireland's New Traditionalists : Fianna Fail republicanism and gender, 1926-1938 / Kenneth Shonk.

By: Shonk, Kenneth.
Publisher: Cork : Cork University Press, 2021Description: 240 pages, illustrations ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9781782054399 (hbk.) :.Subject(s): Fianna Fáil | Republicanism -- Ireland | Ireland -- Politics and government -- 20th century | Ireland -- Social conditions -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 324.2417 Summary: "The creation of Fianna Fáil in 1926 marked a new era in Irish politics wherein an evolved version of Irish republicanism, suited to operate in the Irish Free State, entered the political arena. Fianna Fáil was indeed a political organisation, but it was also a nationalist project, intent on creating a wide-reaching electorate and shaping Ireland's political discourse. De Valera's party defied the moribund direction of Irish republicanism, reversing the trend to the extent that the movement ultimately triumphed with the passage of the 1937 Bunreacht na hÉireann (Constitution of Ireland) and the Éire Confirmation Bill of 1938. Ireland's New Traditionalists situates Fianna Fáil's nationalist republican project within a broader European context by analysing the republican aesthetic through the lens of gender theory as well as situating Ireland within the context of interwar Europe. This analytical approach reveals that Fianna Fáil--the party that 'made' the modern Irish Republic--spent a great deal of time and energy in building a national discourse rooted in a male/female binary that served to 'correct' short term crises and long-term traumas by fabricating versions of an idealised Irish Feminine and Masculine that served to embody the party's vision of a traditionalist, yet modern Ireland." - Book cover
List(s) this item appears in: New Acquisitions 2022
Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title. Log in to add tags.
    average rating: 0.0 (0 votes)
Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due Barcode
Loanable Book Library
Irish Collection 324.2417 SHO (Browse shelf) Available 000436980

"The creation of Fianna Fáil in 1926 marked a new era in Irish politics wherein an evolved version of Irish republicanism, suited to operate in the Irish Free State, entered the political arena. Fianna Fáil was indeed a political organisation, but it was also a nationalist project, intent on creating a wide-reaching electorate and shaping Ireland's political discourse. De Valera's party defied the moribund direction of Irish republicanism, reversing the trend to the extent that the movement ultimately triumphed with the passage of the 1937 Bunreacht na hÉireann (Constitution of Ireland) and the Éire Confirmation Bill of 1938. Ireland's New Traditionalists situates Fianna Fáil's nationalist republican project within a broader European context by analysing the republican aesthetic through the lens of gender theory as well as situating Ireland within the context of interwar Europe. This analytical approach reveals that Fianna Fáil--the party that 'made' the modern Irish Republic--spent a great deal of time and energy in building a national discourse rooted in a male/female binary that served to 'correct' short term crises and long-term traumas by fabricating versions of an idealised Irish Feminine and Masculine that served to embody the party's vision of a traditionalist, yet modern Ireland." - Book cover

There are no comments for this item.

Log in to your account to post a comment.

Powered by Koha