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All my friends are invisible : when the world doesn't understand you, it's time to create your own. A memoir / Jonathan Joly.

By: Saccone Joly, Jonathan, 1980-.
Publisher: London : Quercus, 2022Description: 248 pages ; 22 cm.ISBN: 9781529420579; 1529420571; 9781529420586; 152942058X.Subject(s): Saccone Joly, Jonathan, 1980- -- Childhood and youth | Gender identity | Transgender people -- Identity | Vloggers -- Great Britain -- Biography | Imaginary companions | Gender Identity | Dublin (Ireland) -- Social conditions -- 20th centuryDDC classification: 920 Summary: A mesmeric, harrowing and uplifting childhood memoir that will open up much-needed conversations about identity and mental health. It was an ordinary day in 2016. In Gatwick Airport, Jonathan and his wife Anna were having breakfast with their two little children while waiting for their flight to be called. And then it happened, a familiar sensation that Jonathan hadn't had for decades: an out-of-body experience that transported him to another place, the safe place he used to escape to in his mind when he was a boy. Because growing up in conservative 1980s Dublin, where there was little tolerance for children who were 'different', Jonathan Joly was, indeed, a different sort of child: creative, expressive, and - on the inside - a girl. The limitations of the people around him to understand his differences led to years of tyrannical bullying and abuse, forcing him to withdraw within himself to the point of clinical absence -- Source other than Library or Congress.
List(s) this item appears in: New Acquisitions Spring 2022
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Loanable Book Library
Irish Collection 920 SAC (Browse shelf) Available 000436642

A mesmeric, harrowing and uplifting childhood memoir that will open up much-needed conversations about identity and mental health. It was an ordinary day in 2016. In Gatwick Airport, Jonathan and his wife Anna were having breakfast with their two little children while waiting for their flight to be called. And then it happened, a familiar sensation that Jonathan hadn't had for decades: an out-of-body experience that transported him to another place, the safe place he used to escape to in his mind when he was a boy. Because growing up in conservative 1980s Dublin, where there was little tolerance for children who were 'different', Jonathan Joly was, indeed, a different sort of child: creative, expressive, and - on the inside - a girl. The limitations of the people around him to understand his differences led to years of tyrannical bullying and abuse, forcing him to withdraw within himself to the point of clinical absence -- Source other than Library or Congress.

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