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The British folklorists : a history / by Richard M. Dorson.

By: Dorson, Richard Mercer, 1916-.
Publisher: London : Routledge & Kegan Paul, 1968Description: x, 518 p., 24 plates : ill., ports. ; 25 cm.Subject(s): Folklore | Folklore -- Study and teachingDDC classification: 398
Contents:
I. The Antiquaries -- II. The Antiquary-Folklorists -- III. The Literary Folklorists -- IV. The First Scottish Folklorists -- VI. The Savage Folklorists -- VII. The Great Team of Folklorists -- VIII. The Society Folklorists -- IX. The County Collectors -- X. The Overseas Folklorists -- XI. The Celtic Folklorists -- Epilogue -- Bibliography -- Index
Summary: The British Folklorists: The word 'folklore' was coined in 1846 by an English antiquary, William John Thoms, although Professor Dorson's study shows that the history of the folklore movement had its origins in an earlier period. Men and women in many fields, especially in Victorian times, succumbed to the fascination of folklore. This study shows how its influence extended into literature, history, the classics, archaeology, philology, psychical research, legal and medical antiquities, Scandinavian, Germanic and Celtic studies, and the history of religions. The idea of folklore was carried to the far corners of the British Empire by colonial administrators, missionaries and military officers, and throughout Europe by English travellers. In the present book Professor Dorson traces the historical development of the idea of folklore, beginning in the emergence of English national history with Camden in the sixteenth century and reaching its climaz with the 'Great Team' of Andrew Lang and hist co-workers from the 1870's to the First World War. -- inner sleave of book
List(s) this item appears in: British Library Crime Classics
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Non-Loanable Book Library
Reserve 398 DOR (Browse shelf) Not for loan

Includes chapters on overseas and Celtic folklorists.

Illustrations on lining papers.

First published in 1968

bibl p442-460; index.

I. The Antiquaries -- II. The Antiquary-Folklorists -- III. The Literary Folklorists -- IV. The First Scottish Folklorists -- VI. The Savage Folklorists -- VII. The Great Team of Folklorists -- VIII. The Society Folklorists -- IX. The County Collectors -- X. The Overseas Folklorists -- XI. The Celtic Folklorists -- Epilogue -- Bibliography -- Index
List of Illustrations:
I. The Antiquaries: 1. Francis Grose -- 2. William Hone --
II. The Antiquary-Folklorists: 3. Thomas Wright -- 4. William John Thoms --
IV. The First Scottish Folklorists: 5. Robert Chambers -- 6. Hugh Miller -- 7. John Graham Dalyell --
V. The Mythological Folklorists: 8. Robert Brown, Jr. -- 9. Max Muller --
VII. The Great Team of Folklorists: 10. Andrew Lang -- 11. Alfred Nutt -- 12. Edward Clodd -- 13. George Laurence Gomme -- 14. Alice Bertha Gomme -- 15. Edwin Sidney Hartland --
VIII. The Society Folklorists: 16. Moses Gaster - 17. Robert Ranulph Marett -- IX. The County Collectors: 18. Charlotte Burne -- X. The Overseas Folklorists: 19. Mary Henrietta Kingsley -- XI. The Celtic Folklorists: 20. John Francis Campbell of Islay -- 21. Alexander Carmichael -- 22. John Gregorson Campbell -- 23. John Rhys -- 24. Douglas Hyde -- 25. Lady Isabella Persse Gregory -- 26a. Lachlin Macneill the story teller, Campbell of Islay, and Hector Maclean the school teacher and transcriber -- 26b. Donald Macphie the story teller of south Uist, from a sketch by Campbell of Islay


The British Folklorists: The word 'folklore' was coined in 1846 by an English antiquary, William John Thoms, although Professor Dorson's study shows that the history of the folklore movement had its origins in an earlier period. Men and women in many fields, especially in Victorian times, succumbed to the fascination of folklore. This study shows how its influence extended into literature, history, the classics, archaeology, philology, psychical research, legal and medical antiquities, Scandinavian, Germanic and Celtic studies, and the history of religions. The idea of folklore was carried to the far corners of the British Empire by colonial administrators, missionaries and military officers, and throughout Europe by English travellers.

In the present book Professor Dorson traces the historical development of the idea of folklore, beginning in the emergence of English national history with Camden in the sixteenth century and reaching its climaz with the 'Great Team' of Andrew Lang and hist co-workers from the 1870's to the First World War. -- inner sleave of book

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