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Exposed : desire and disobediance in the digital age / Bernard E. Harcourt

By: Harcourt, Bernard E.
Publisher: Massachusetts : Harvard University Press, 2015Description: 364 p. : ill. ; 24 cm.ISBN: 9780674504578 : (hbk.).Subject(s): Information technology -- Social aspects | Privacy, Right ofDDC classification: 303.4 Subject: "Exploiting our boundless desire to access everything all the time, digital technology is breaking down whatever boundaries still exist between the state, the market, and the private realm. Bernard Harcourt offers a powerful critique of what he calls the expository society, revealing just how unfree we are becoming and how little we seem to care. Review: Harcourt draws from his background in law and political theory to understand the ways our online lives are monitored. The way we live today, according to Harcourt, with the constant Tweeting, Instagramming, emailing, and chatting, is leaving us exposed Harcourt worries about how easily we give up personal information. Much private personal data today can be gathered through Google searches, online shopping likes, and retweets. The information can be bought and sold through [Facebook] ads, and can be accessed by the FBI, the NSA. Through the PRISM program, the NSA can get ahold of data from Microsoft, Facebook, YouTube, Skype, and more, for $20 million a year a paltry sum, given the richness of personal data" -- Copac
List(s) this item appears in: New acquisitions 2016
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Item type Current location Collection Call number Status Date due
Loanable Book Library
General Collection 303.4 HAR (Browse shelf) Available

Includes bibliographical references and index

"Exploiting our boundless desire to access everything all the time, digital technology is breaking down whatever boundaries still exist between the state, the market, and the private realm. Bernard Harcourt offers a powerful critique of what he calls the expository society, revealing just how unfree we are becoming and how little we seem to care. Review: Harcourt draws from his background in law and political theory to understand the ways our online lives are monitored. The way we live today, according to Harcourt, with the constant Tweeting, Instagramming, emailing, and chatting, is leaving us exposed Harcourt worries about how easily we give up personal information. Much private personal data today can be gathered through Google searches, online shopping likes, and retweets. The information can be bought and sold through [Facebook] ads, and can be accessed by the FBI, the NSA. Through the PRISM program, the NSA can get ahold of data from Microsoft, Facebook, YouTube, Skype, and more, for $20 million a year a paltry sum, given the richness of personal data" -- Copac

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